Cold Call Emails Can Be Annoying. Read An Example of a Cold Call Email That Worked!

A couple of weeks ago I did a blog post titled, “We Are All in Sales. Let’s Do It Well!” In the blog post I addressed a cold call email I received that didn’t work well for me and I explained why.

This blog post discloses a cold call email that I received that DID work for me. Here is how it went.


Hi Becky!

I was doing some research today and came across your post: https://www.nunndesign.com/selling-on-etsy-10-great-resources/

Nice collection!

I wanted to send a quick email to let you know about a massive roundup interview with the successful Etsy sellers we’ve made. You can have a look at it here:
https://www.changedthe link.com

I normally wouldn’t send a cold email  (I get them all the time too :)), but I think it can be a good addition to your page and provide additional value to your audience.

If you were willing to add my link to your page, I’d happily share it with our 10000+ social followers to help you gain some visibility in exchange.

Please let me know what you think.

Thanks,

X


Let’s Break This Down:

The writer/seller did many things really well. Let me break her email down to explain what was working for me and why.

1. The writer told me how she found me and provided me the link from our blog to reference the article she was referring to.

MY POINT: She made it easy for me to get on the same page as her quickly by providing an active link to the Nunn Design blog post she was referring too.
MY POINT: She also provided proof that she was really researching and that she did “come across our post”. This helped me establish a level of trust with her within the first paragraph.


2. She next wrote, “Nice collection”. She complimented me on doing a good job.

MY POINT: Everyone likes to hear what they’re doing well and be recognized for it. I started to actually like this person by the second paragraph.


3. Next, she went on to state: “I wanted to send a quick email to let you know about a massive roundup interview with the successful Etsy sellers we’ve made. You can have a look at it here: https://www.changedthe link.com”
I like that she valued my time and told me she wanted to “be quick.” She made it easy for me to see what she was talking about by providing an easy way for me to click an active link so that I could see the Etsy seller article.

MY POINT: Know your audience! She knows that I’m busy and values my time. She made it easy for me to get right to the article by providing a link.


4. Next she wrote: “I normally wouldn’t send a cold email  (I get them all the time too :))…” Face it! Selling is tough. She emotionally put her foot into the door before I had the chance to slam it by being human, relating to my experience and being vulnerable.

MY POINT: Be real and build a connection.


5. She then went on to state, “but I think it can be a good addition to your page and provide additional value to your audience.” Boom!

MY POINT: Show me how this is a win for me! Show me how I get to look good to my customers. Show me why this is worth my time! Nicely done!!!


6. Next she went into, “If you were willing to add my link to your page, I’d happily share it with our 10000+ social followers to help you gain some visibility in exchange.

MY POINT: Give me an incentive to take the time to look and do what is being asked of me. Move me forward and tell me the benefit my action will bring.


7. And for closing, “Please let me know what you think.”

MY POINT: Keep the conversation open and moving forward. Ask the customer to come to a decision. Have them decide “yes” or “no.”


In Summary:

I checked out the article. I added the link. I responded to her email that I had done so. She provided the exposure as promised. Boom! Boom! Boom. 3 emails between us and we were done and we both benefited. Now, do you see why I like this experience?


Same Company – Different Approach:

So, I just have to share with you another experience. I received an email from the same company, but a different sales person. His approach was totally different, and needless to say, I responded to none and did nothing he asked. After the third email, I asked him to take me off his list. I changed the name and deleted any information that would incriminate him. I honestly don’t want to be slamming people. I’m showing this mostly to show you the contrast of another approach BY THE SAME COMPANY that did not work.

The gentleman wrote:

“Salutations Becky

You don’t know me. I’m Phil, nice to kinda meet you.

I got your email from a cheeky little tool called Clearbit *gasp* 

But hey, at least you know you’re important enough to have people actually seek out your email address!

Anywhos, I’ll be brief.

I recently came across your article: www.nunndesign.com/10-things-i-learned-about-etsy-part-1/

and noticed that you linked to a very popular resource, www.etsy.com/help/article/259

It’s a very popular resource, but it’s old, outdated and simply not relevant…(my girlfriend thinks the same of me)

Luckily for you, I’ve recently published a similar article that goes above and beyond. https://www.changedthename.com

Your readers need and want up to date information. With the current link you’re providing, they’re just not getting that.

Feel like updating the link with a link to our blog?

To sweeten the deal, if you follow through, I’ll come around and take your garbage out for a month.

Thoughts?”

I just deleted it, but then it was followed up with another email:

Hey Becky

I reached out to you a few days ago about your article:
www.nunndesign.com/10-things-i-learned-about-etsy-part-1/

I’m just wondering if you got my email that was full of witty prose. I haven’t had a reply, and I refuse to believe my charm hasn’t worked it’s magic on you.

Did you get my last email? Did you have a chance to read it and consider the offer? The current Etsy guide that you’re linking to is old (2014!) and doesn’t even reflect Etsy’s own change in their policies.

Sending your readers to old, outdated content is…well, not a good way to build a loyal following.

Here’s our fantastic article that you should link to if you want to make your readers adore you.https://www.changedthename.com

The offer about taking your garbage out is still on the table, too.”

I deleted this one too. And then, email #3!

“Ahoy Becky,

I feel like you know me by now, but I still don’t know you.

 Since you know me so well, you’ll see I’m persistent. So about that backlink…

I haven’t had a reply out of you, so I think I may have to break out my 2 secret weapons.

The first one is an offer to link back to some of your content. I think you’ll find that we both have a similar audience.

We have a high DR, and with a back link from us, I think we could get you ranking on the first page of some pretty popular keywords that I see you already rank for. Being on the first page means more traffic to your blog.

My second secret weapon is Owen.

Say hi to Owen the Otter. (there was a picture of a cute otter).

Isn’t your day so much better now?

I did respond to email #3 with “please take me off your list.” I’m not going to dissect this email, but based on what I wrote earlier about what worked, can you see the things that didn’t work here? The approach was totally different, but the structure had a lot of the same elements. I’m sure that this works for many people, but it didn’t for me.


What Do You Think?

What do you think? Do you see the difference? Which approach would have worked for you? The first one or the second one?


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